5 Crucial Ways Weather-Resistant Padlocks Help Maintain Your Security (2)

Non-Apparent Security Compromises

Besides avoiding obvious issues that can arise from decreased functionality, or the complete breakdown of the padlock, weather-resistant padlocks also protect from the issues you don’t detect. When a lock begins to break down, it can become much easier to pick or bump open. Lock picking and key bumping are some of the more popular forms of covert entry.


Though a criminal is more likely to try and break or bypass the padlock, if your padlock is not weather-resistant, there is a greater risk of these types of forced entries. When a lock begins to wear out due to weathering, certain security in place can begin to fail. Pins can get lodged in their chambers and springs can wear out so that there is almost no skill required to successfully open the padlock covertly. However, daily use will not alert the key user of these issues. The only way to know your security is not failing in this way is to invest in weather-resistant padlocks.

Extended Life Span

Nothing lasts forever, and almost any padlock will eventually need to undergo some form of lock repair, but by getting a weather-resistant padlock you can extend the life of your lock. You will even be decreasing how frequently it will need to be serviced. The longer your lock lasts, the longer your security lasts.

The same factors that increase a padlock’s weather resistance also serve to increase its general strength. That means that the lock core will stand up to more rotations. So even if no one is trying to break your lock, or the lock is not being damaged too severely by the weather, a weather-resistant padlock will still last longer due to the high-quality manufacturing.

Conclusion

Once you know how to recognize a quality padlock, you will be on your way to better security. But if you want to maintain that level of security, you better be sure that your padlock is weather-resistant. Make certain that your security can stand the heat, and doesn’t mind being left out in the cold.

This article is written by Ralph Goodman (click here to read more about him).

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